M

miska's blog

cressus:

     No one before Bernini had managed to make marble so carnal. In his nimble hands it would flatter and stream, quiver and sweat. His figures weep and shout, their torses twist and run, and arch themselves in spasms of intense sensation. He could, like an alchemist, change one material into another - marble into trees, leaves, hair, and, of course, flesh.  
     -   Simon Schama’s Power of Art. Bernini

(via vonmoire)

thatscienceguy:

Lightning Appreciation Post:

  • There are nearly 500 lightning strikes every second around the world.
  • Only about 100 of these strike the earth, the others are between and within the clouds themselves.
  • Lightning is very visible from space (last gif from Astronaut Reid Wiseman)
  • Besides regular storms (thunder storms, hurricanes, etc.) lightning can be found in volcanoes (gif 3) and even intense forest fires.

In conclusion: nature is fucking awesome!

(via vonmoire)

atlasobscura:

Kosmaj Monument - Kosmaj, Serbia
The Kosmaj Monument (Kosmaj Spomenik in Serbian), is made of six freestanding concrete structures, each roughly 40 meters high, that taken together look a bit like a spaceship sent through time from a future envisioned in the 1970’s.
Built in 1970 by an unknown artist, the brutalist monument celebrates a group of partisan fighters in World War II who battled against the German occupation in the south of Belgrade. During the fighting the battalions lost over 5,000 soldiers but their “guns of freedom kept shooting.” The monument itself sits atop the highest peak in the region like some sort of Christmas star crowning a mountain-sized tree. According to modern visitors, the monument is in some disrepair and unfortunately the locals do not seem to have any interest in restoring it. 
Plan a visit to Serbia’s Kosmaj Monument in-person, on Atlas Obscura!

atlasobscura:

Kosmaj Monument - Kosmaj, Serbia

The Kosmaj Monument (Kosmaj Spomenik in Serbian), is made of six freestanding concrete structures, each roughly 40 meters high, that taken together look a bit like a spaceship sent through time from a future envisioned in the 1970’s.

Built in 1970 by an unknown artist, the brutalist monument celebrates a group of partisan fighters in World War II who battled against the German occupation in the south of Belgrade. During the fighting the battalions lost over 5,000 soldiers but their “guns of freedom kept shooting.” The monument itself sits atop the highest peak in the region like some sort of Christmas star crowning a mountain-sized tree. According to modern visitors, the monument is in some disrepair and unfortunately the locals do not seem to have any interest in restoring it. 

Plan a visit to Serbia’s Kosmaj Monument in-person, on Atlas Obscura!